Rachel Dobbs: artist & educator

Tag

DIY culture

ACE Cheatsheet 1 Year On

Reflections on a DIY approach to addressing the access needs of neurodiverse artists In August 2016, I published a simple “ACE cheatsheet” that I had developed to help make sense of the Arts Council England’s Grants For The Arts application… Continue Reading →

Mapping Your Crowd – essential crowdfunding preparation

Behind-the-scenes planning for LOW PROFILE’s upcoming crowdfunder – Who is part of your crowdfunding ‘crowd’? Who wants you (and your projects) to succeed?

Arts Funding: Applying For Grants

What do you need to know before you apply for grant funding for an arts or community project? A series of video guides to understand fundraising & applying for grants.

How Plymouth Art Weekender can can help nurture the city’s arts eco system

Exploring ideas on how Plymouth Art Weekender (PAW) could develop further for future weekenders by reflecting on my experiences this year (2016). What is Plymouth Art Weekender’s role in nurturing the city’s visual arts eco system?

A short history of Plymouth’s contemporary arts ecology

I’m having a go at compiling a short ‘history’ of Plymouth’s contemporary arts ecology, and significant milestones that have contributed to the development of visual arts and experimental arts activity in the city. Please contribute!!!

Social Making Symposium – Plymouth 2016

A series of articles reflecting on Social Making: Socially Engaged Practice Now & Next, organised by Plymouth-based social makers Take A Part – focussing on the methodologies employed by a range of socially engaged practitioners operating in the UK (and further afield) and the human scale impacts of chosen case studies.

Achieving Empowerment

How can communities and artists work together to achieve empowerment? Reflecting on Take A Part’s Social Making: Socially Engaged Practice Now & Next, read a series of ‘take home’ points for artists & organisations working in socially engaged practice.

Re-defining the currency of success

How do artists, organisations & funders measure success in relation to socially engaged practice? Reflecting on Take A Part’s Social Making: Socially Engaged Practice Now & Next, read how researchers have teamed up with Situations to develop a new Visual Matrix methodology and what action points project creators need to consider.

Building in succession (as a requirement) in arts & community projects

Why is it ESSENTIAL to think carefully about succession in arts & community projects? Reflecting on Take A Part’s Social Making: Socially Engaged Practice Now & Next, read how successful socially engaged arts projects have managed the process and what action points project creators need to consider.

Building more empowered local communities through local global online learning

Read my recent provocation on Open Education and how digital platforms can enable improved community learning and development for Digital Plymouth Conference 2016. It’s sparked lots of conversation since the event!!

ACE G4A application CHEATSHEET – Arts Council England Grants for the Arts

Here are 2 useful documents that could revolutionise writing your ACE Grants for the Arts applications!!! A handy ‘overview’ document (for brainstorming / planning / tracking progress) and a set of the current questions, colour coded to use with the overview to write your drafts on… You can thank me later!

Supporting neurodiverse & neurodivergent artists

Over the last few months, I have been supporting a number of neurodiverse artists to make ACE Grants For The Arts applications. As someone who is relatively neurotypical, this has made me increasingly aware of the problematic nature of application processes / systems of gatekeeping put in place to select which arts projects receive funding. Here’s my first attempt to write about some of the things I have learned…

Crowdfunding Project Analysis Toolkit

NEW: Free download – Crowdfunding Project Analysis Toolkit PDF. Learn how to make a great crowdfunding project today!!

Top 7 Reasons I Would Back Your Crowdfunding Project

Here’s a quick run-down of really important things your crowdfunding project needs to communicate to potential backers

Useful Resources: DIY Arts Activity

I’ve been invited to speak at a number of events recently on topics to do with fundraising, pitching projects, setting up and managing DIY arts projects. Here’s a collection of useful resources (available online) that I’ve been recommending that people… Continue Reading →

Why I set up the Plymouth Boardgame Meetup

In December 2014, I decided to set up a brand new Meetup group for people to come together to play boardgames in Plymouth. After a little looking and asking around, I was finding it difficult to find existing groups of… Continue Reading →

Bruce Asbestos: Tiny Canvas Friday

INTERVIEW:

Talking with Bruce Asbestos about his recent Tiny Canvas Friday project on Facebook and the notion of entrepreneurship as a creative practice, social media as ‘form’, inhabiting online spaces, A/B testing and soliciting interaction from potential audiences in social spaces.

7 things artists could learn from board game Kickstarters

Over the last 2 years, I have worked on 2 successful Kickstarter campaigns (Cornish Smuggler & Waggle Dance, raising over £50,000 in total) with Grublin Games (an indie boardgame publisher based in Cornwall) which has involved a fair amount of research into different approaches to using Kickstarter. In that time, it has also become more usual for artists and arts organisations to use crowdfunding as a way to raise money for their projects.

Use Kickstarter as a distribution model & a tool to gauge interest

As an artist, what are your challenges when getting your work to an interested audience?

What is the established distribution model for the types of work you are interested in making?

How can you use a crowdfunding platform to by-pass that distribution model to reach an audience that would be interested in your work?

Stop thinking of Kickstarter as a platform for donations

Your Project Rewards shouldn’t be an afterthought – they can actually be a way to form your project.

How can you think about the exchange value of what you are generating through the project and approach this creatively to give your campaign a better chance of success?

Use Kickstarter to create a new community around your project

In the most successful boardgame projects, there is an on-going conversation between the project creators and backers, and between backers from around the world. The sense of temporary community generated through this conversation creates an engaged community of interest and can be exciting to be involved in.

What are artists missing out on by ignoring the potential of conversation in their crowdfunded projects?

Develop projects where a Kickstarter campaign is an integral part rather than an afterthought

What does it mean for a ‘crowd’ to fund your project?

What makes your project, its outcomes and rewards interesting, unique, novel and different?

How can you avoid becoming ‘just another’ crowdfunding campaign?

Focus on your timescale and actually delivering

How are you going to break down the timeline for your project into separate stages?

Will your timescale be realistic?

Will you actually be able to deliver your rewards?

Use Kickstarter as a way to generate excitement about your arts practice

What are the other benefits of running a Kickstarter campaign?

Would you like to give a worldwide exposure to your work, make new professional connections and find new audiences?

Some people are never going to back things on Kickstarter

How can you give your project life after the Kickstarter campaign?

What do you need to consider when making an ‘exit strategy’ for your project?

What do you do after it’s all over?

Gambling Man: Mark Greenwood

BLOG:

Writing and reflection around the ideas of provincial poetics and DIY aesthetics with reference to Mark Greenwood’s spoken word recordings White Mice, All Colours and the indie record label one.c from July 2010

“In the aftermath of the Artists Lottery Syndicate launch, having retired to a back-garden in Ealing, I find myself discussing, with two of my fellow syndicate members, a kind of ‘provincial’ experience shared by artists like ourselves, having decided to base our arts practices outside of London (in Nottingham, Glasgow and Plymouth respectively)…

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