Rachel Dobbs: artist & educator

Tag

board games

Why I’m backing Statecraft

Statecraft is a new political strategy boardgame for 2-6 players that has just launched on Kickstarter… Now if that is not enough to whet your appetite, here’s a little about why I am backing this game…

Being the average UK boardgamer (and inclusivity, diversity and microaggression in boardgames)

Over the last few weeks I have been thinking a lot about inclusivity, diversity and microaggression in boardgames and the boardgaming world – in terms of design, playing, advertising and assumptions that are made by those commissioning, publishing and promoting… Continue Reading →

Why you should go to a Boardgame Convention…

I never thought I’d go to a boardgames convention. I am a complete nerd for lots of things… learning stuff, cover versions, stand-up comedy, weird electronic things that make strange noises, wikipedia, other people’s obsession with survivalism… but I don’t… Continue Reading →

Why I set up the Plymouth Boardgame Meetup

In December 2014, I decided to set up a brand new Meetup group for people to come together to play boardgames in Plymouth. After a little looking and asking around, I was finding it difficult to find existing groups of… Continue Reading →

7 things artists could learn from board game Kickstarters

Over the last 2 years, I have worked on 2 successful Kickstarter campaigns (Cornish Smuggler & Waggle Dance, raising over £50,000 in total) with Grublin Games (an indie boardgame publisher based in Cornwall) which has involved a fair amount of research into different approaches to using Kickstarter. In that time, it has also become more usual for artists and arts organisations to use crowdfunding as a way to raise money for their projects.

Use Kickstarter as a distribution model & a tool to gauge interest

As an artist, what are your challenges when getting your work to an interested audience?

What is the established distribution model for the types of work you are interested in making?

How can you use a crowdfunding platform to by-pass that distribution model to reach an audience that would be interested in your work?

Stop thinking of Kickstarter as a platform for donations

Your Project Rewards shouldn’t be an afterthought – they can actually be a way to form your project.

How can you think about the exchange value of what you are generating through the project and approach this creatively to give your campaign a better chance of success?

Use Kickstarter to create a new community around your project

In the most successful boardgame projects, there is an on-going conversation between the project creators and backers, and between backers from around the world. The sense of temporary community generated through this conversation creates an engaged community of interest and can be exciting to be involved in.

What are artists missing out on by ignoring the potential of conversation in their crowdfunded projects?

Develop projects where a Kickstarter campaign is an integral part rather than an afterthought

What does it mean for a ‘crowd’ to fund your project?

What makes your project, its outcomes and rewards interesting, unique, novel and different?

How can you avoid becoming ‘just another’ crowdfunding campaign?

Focus on your timescale and actually delivering

How are you going to break down the timeline for your project into separate stages?

Will your timescale be realistic?

Will you actually be able to deliver your rewards?

Use Kickstarter as a way to generate excitement about your arts practice

What are the other benefits of running a Kickstarter campaign?

Would you like to give a worldwide exposure to your work, make new professional connections and find new audiences?

Some people are never going to back things on Kickstarter

How can you give your project life after the Kickstarter campaign?

What do you need to consider when making an ‘exit strategy’ for your project?

What do you do after it’s all over?

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